Canine Pregnancy – What To Expect From Your Expecting Dog.

 

Canine pregnancy is a joyful occasion for pet owners but it can also be a stressful one. Although taking care of a pregnant dog may sound simple, pet owners soon find pregnant dogs need a lot of attention.  As with people, when expecting a new baby a person entire life changes. Pet owner need not to freight as throughout this article your will learn just about everything you will expect from your expecting dog. As Benjamin Franklin once said, “an ounce of preparation is worth a pound of the cure.” (Benjamin Franklin, goodreads.com)

The first change that pet owners will not in their pregnant dog is a change in diet. Your dog may eat more, eat less or refuse food for a short amount of time. Pregnant dogs must consume food in order to support the energy levels required to grow the average litter of pups (4 to 6). Mothers which refuse to eat should only last a day or two as nausea is common. See your veterinarian if food refusal continues. Mother dogs which are close to birthing the pups or those that are nursing require more food to produce a large milk supply.

The second part of canine pregnancy dog owners should expect is the duration of the pregnancy. Canine gestation is much shorter than that of a human and can come to a surprise to many dog owners. A pregnant dog will remain pregnant for up to 63 days on average, which is just over two months. During these two months pet owners should not engage their dogs into stressful physical activities. Long walks and light playtime are perfect forms of physical activity for a pregnant dog. Do not restrict physical activity as this will cause problems for the dog during birth and make pregnancy more difficult.

The third portion of canine pregnancy dog owners should expect is isolation. During the last few weeks to day of gestation, you will find your dog more isolated than normal. Dogs tend to need isolation during the birthing process and it is best to give her a place to do so.

Find a quiet place in the home or sheltered area for your dog to go, and possibly give birth. Bed this area down with towels, blankets or an old dog bed for her to be comfortable. Having an area premade for her relieves your dog of stress and you know where she is if problems arise.

References: https://www.facebook.com/pages/City-Pet-Care-Clinic/389164094548066?fref=nf , http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/tag/preparation

Photo courtesy of World Tik

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